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Study shows that an anti-inflammatory diet helps with inflammation and oxidative & metabolic stress in overweight men

Posted March 15, 2010 in Anti-Aging Medicine, Disease Prevention

My last blog post talked about the role of fatty acids and inflammation in disease development. I just read a study performed by scientists in the Netherlands who used the supplements Resveratrol, vitamins C and E, green tea extract, Omega 3 fatty acids and tomato extract, all chosen for their evidence-based anti-inflammatoryproperties, to see if they would lesson inflammation.

During the study, the above-named supplements were combined and given to 36 healthy but overweight men with mildly elevated plasma C-reactive proteinconcentrations (the CRP level is a blood test that shows the level of inflammation in an individual’s system). The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossoverstudy with treatment periods of 5 weeks. Inflammatory and oxidativestress defense markers were measured via blood and urine testing. 120 plasma proteins, 274 plasma metabolites (lipids,free fatty acids, and polar compounds), and the transcriptomesof peripheral blood mononuclear cells and adipose tissue werealso measured.

The results of the study were mixed. On the positive side, the plasma adiponectin concentrations increased by 7% (low concentrations of plasma adiponectin are found in obese individuals and predict the development of type 2 diabetes) butC-reactive protein levels were unchanged, thereby suggesting that inflammation wasn’t reduced by the supplements. However, many subtle changes were detected such as decreased inflammation of fatty tissue, improved endothelialfunction, affected oxidative stress, and increased liver fattyacid oxidation, all positive indicators that supplements were effective in creating positive health changes in the participants.

It’s important to pay attention to this kind of information, as more and more scientists are developing an interest in and studies of supplements as counterbalancing mechanisms against stress, pollution, aging and as disease prevention.

A copy of the trial can be found through this link.

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